Lesbian Herstory Archives AudioVisual Collections

Browse Items (25 total)

  • 030-02_nyc-gay-pride-1993_a_c.mp4

    Raw footage of the the Gay Pride Parade in New York City near Washington Square Park. Includes shots of spectators and parade participants including the Gay Police Association, RuPaul, Love Lounge, New Jersey Lesbian Coalition, The Eulenspiegel Society, Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays Long Island, Senior Action in a Gay Environment (SAGE), the Hetrick-Martin Institute, People With AIDS Coalition (PWAC) and PWAC Mother's Support Group, AIDS Resource Center, Community Health Project, The Village AIDS Programs, and Gay Men's Health Crisis. "Boycott Colorado" signs are present throughout, referencing Colorado's 1992 ballot Amendment 2 that prevented protected status under the law for homosexuals or bisexuals.
  • 053-03_clinton-nyc-police_a_c.mp4

    This video is documentation of a demonstration protesting Don’t Ask Don’t Tell. The protest occurred on September 23, 1993 outside a fundraiser for the then prospective mayor of New York David Dinkins in which Bill Clinton was speaking. This segment combines raw footage artifacts with more formal documentation of the chants, and informal interviews with the participants. The last portion of this video shows police attempting to forcibly remove demonstrators.
  • 053-17_clark-corner_a_c_2.mp4

    This video features comedian Georgia Ragsdale. The video includes clips from an interview and stand up footage from one of Ragsdale’s performances. She discusses the way she approaches her work and being out as a comedian. Ragsdale explains that for her, “Being out as a comic isn't a choice, because as a stand up comedian all you have is your worldview, your perspective on life and your life and the people around you, so I don’t see how you have a choice to be in or out if you're a stand up comedian.” She also reminisces about her first hour long show when circumstances forced her to come up with enough material in a very short period of time.
  • 053-17_clark-corner_a_c_1.mp4

    A woman reports about discrimination and threats she and her girlfriend faced when they kissed at a restaurant in Brooklyn Heights. She talks about the “kiss in” she and the Lesbian Avengers were having restaurant in protest. She also talks about plans to file a police report and take legal action if possible.
  • 030-01_nyc-gay-pride-1993_a_c.mp4

    This clip shows archival footage of the New York City Gay Pride Parade on June 27, 1993. This particular parade represented the 25th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots. It was also taking place at an apex for the movement against Don’t Ask Don’t Tell, banning out gay people from military service. Participating groups include the Lesbian and Gay Big Apple Corps, the Lesbian Avengers, the Women's Action Coalition, the Gay Veterans Association, and the Lesbian Herstory Archives. Also seen marching is politician Ruth Messinger and comedian/performer Lea DeLaria.
  • pamela_oline.jpg

    Pamela Oline is interviewed. She is heterosexual and talks about her path to and experience of being a member of DOB and campaigning for gay and lesbian rights. She describes her childhood growing up in England, moving to America when she was 14 and changing career from a mathematician and to a psychotherapist. Recognizing the psychological issues of the time, she decided to understand the lesbian community from the inside. She talks about DOB meetings, lesbian and feminism issues, radical and conventional activism, marriage, and GAU (Gay Academic Union) meetings, panel discussions, etc.
  • martha_shelley.jpg

    Martha Shelley is interviewed in New York in 1989. She talks about being a lesbian in New York from the 1960s, the negative views of lesbians portrayed by psychologists, the bar scene, roles and her use of a pseudonym. She talks about finding DOB, the meetings and discussions that took place, and her contributions to the Ladder. She talks about Jean Powers and other members of DOB and describes the members as mixed race, working class, couples and singles. She also talks about her political activism in terms of DOB, peace, civil rights and the Stonewall Riots, including the marches she was involved in and the speeches she made.
  • marilyn_lamkay.jpg

    Marliyn Lamkay is interviewed in New York City in 1987 (it seems to continue from a previous video and is perhaps continued in another video). She talks about being a lesbian in New York and coming out to her family and professionally, her relationships and religious beliefs. She discusses lesbian roles and how she didn't fit into any of the existing roles, even in the DOB community. She discusses community building and CR groups when she was younger and how she went on to hold workshops about resources for gay and lesbian New Yorkers at Bronx Community College. She mentions New YorkDOB meetings and the influence that DOB had in the creation of subsequent lesbian groups and communities.
  • barbara_emmerth.jpg

    Barbara Emmerth is interviewed in New York City in 1988. She discusses the uniqueness of coming out on West Virginia in the 1950s where there was little stigma attached to homosexuality because there was so little understanding or awareness of it. She speaks about her relationships, moving to New York City in the 1960s and her involvement with DOB (including a brief stint as the VP of the New York chapter) and with SAGE (Services & Advocacy for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Elders).
  • alma_routsong.jpg

    Alma Routsong is interviewed in New York in 1990. She discusses DOB groups and events, as well as the demise of DOB.
  • alma_routsong.jpg

    Alma Routsong is interviewed in New York in 1990. She discusses her early experiences of being a lesbian and coming out. She explains how lesbian literature of the time informed her about DOB and influenced her to leave her husband and move to New York with her lover. Alma also discusses her writing career and use of a pseudonym.
  • [2014SP]ForTobybyShirleyloSideA.mp3

    This audio recording discusses the Daughters Of Bilitis New York City chapter. The main voice on the recording is a woman who was elected national president. She talks about her time as national president during the start of the Womens Rights movement. The recording discusses the success of the New York City Chapter and the new role they were playing in the Womens Rights movement.
  • 87466_ca_object_representations_media_106_original.jpg

    Side A: Mabel Hampton describes meeting other lesbians and associating with other women "in the life". Also discussed is her experience during the 1920s of being set up and sentenced to serve three years for a fabricated prostitution charge at the Bedford Hills Correctional Facility for Women. Side B: Mabel's WWII era activities, including being an Air Raid Warden in Harlem, and meeting married women who ""came out"" during their husband's absence due to the war."
  • 1652_ca_object_representations_media_136_original.jpg

    Mabel discusses her early life as a lesbian in the Village between the two world wars, including the rooming house where she lived and the parties she attended. She describes how women dressed, what they ate at the parties, what they did at the parties, including dancing, the records they listened to, and the general social life of these parties. She describes the interracial relations between white and black lesbians. She also discusses the language lesbians used to describe themselves at the time, including "bulldaggers", "lady lovers", and "butches". She also tells the story of a large lesbian marriage ceremony in Central Park West, officated by a gay minister named Rev. Monroe and how the couple managed to get an offical marriage certificate. She also discusses gay life in Harlem and the New York City drag balls.
  • 24608_ca_object_representations_media_115_original.jpg

    Mabel talks about her life at theater Lafayette on Coney Island in the 20s. She also talks about the dress code of her and her friends; also the language describing lesbians back in the 1920s.
  • 16045_ca_object_representations_media_99_original.jpg

    Oral history interview of Mabel Hampton. Side A: Mabel discusses Coney Island, and her relationships with women, including Mildred Mitchell.
  • 2420_ca_object_representations_media_94_original.jpg

    Oral history interview of Mabel Hampton. Mabel Hampton reminisces about her life in the early 1920s. Mabel talks about going to Coney Island, cabarets, and various parties around New York City where women could meet other women. She discusses her friends and relationships with particular emphasis on Lillian Foster.
  • 39058_ca_object_representations_media_35_original.jpg

    Oral history interview with Mabel Hampton. Side A: Mabel sings and talks about her life with Lillian Foster, and stories from her youth. Side B: She describes her life in Jersey City, Coney Island and the rape by her uncle. She also talks about the pitfalls of falling in love, and being a working woman at 80 years old.
  • 14478_ca_object_representations_media_122_original.jpg

    Oral history interview of Mabel Hampton. Mabel talks about her childhood; coming out with a woman she met at Coney Island; her relationship with Lillian Foster; the LHA and her respect for Joan Nestle and Deborah Edel.
  • 12774_ca_object_representations_media_36_original.jpg

    Oral history interview of Mabel Hampton. Mabel describes running away from home and the New Jersey family who cared for her, while they sought Mabel's family. Mabel falsified her personal information in order to avoid reuniting with her abusive uncle in New York. Mabel speaks of her early 20s, her interaction within the underground gay and lesbian community. She begins explaining her 1923 arrest at Bedford Hills Prison and how she was setup by her friend's husband for prostitution. Side A = 9:38 minutes
  • 28245_ca_object_representations_media_62_original.jpg

    Oral History interview of Mabel Hampton. Mabel discusses her early life in South Carolina and New York.
  • 2420_ca_object_representations_media_94_original.jpg

    Oral history interview of Mabel Hampton. Mabel discusses lesbian marriage in the 1930s and 1940s, including stories of women getting married and where the ceremonies were. She tells stories about women she knew who had husbands and families, jealousy among women, and passion. She talks about her own experiences with passion and jealousy, including her crushes and relationships. She discusses her first relationship with a white woman, women she had crushes on, women she felt threatened by, her relationship with Lillian, and an experience at a "party house" in Bedford Hills. At the end of the tape there is a discussion about Lillian's tombstone and what to put on it.
  • 12774_ca_object_representations_media_36_original.jpg

    Oral history interview of Mabel Hampton. Mabel discusses meeting her partner Lillian Foster in 1932, whom she was with for 40 years until her passing in 1979. Mabel also mentions highlights of her professional career including performing at the "World's Fair" (New York, 1939?), Carnegie Hall and Coney Island. Mabel also recounts a story involving an incident with a classmate in her youth. The tape finishes with a rendition of "My Buddy", sung by an unidentified vocalist and pianist
  • 55447_ca_object_representations_media_126_original.jpg

    Oral history interview of Mabel Hampton. Side A: Mabel tells the story of her arrival in New Jersey, and how she found the people who first took her there. Side B: Mabel sings the American popular song, "My Buddy", and also explains how she left her uncle in New York and went to New Jersey. She talks in detail about the first couple days that she spent in a home in Jersey City, and her reticence to discuss details about her origins with the people that took her in. Additional discussion includes a description of the first time she was kissed by a woman, and why she didn't pursue relationships with married women.
  • 20173_ca_object_representations_media_10_original.jpg

    Oral history interview for Feminary: A Lesbian-Feminist Journal for the South. Joan Nestle interviews Mabel Hampton at 77. Mabel describes her childhood in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, her train journey to New York City, the city vs. the country, meeting lesbians and her views on race, sisterhood and the fight for lesbian rights.
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